Emergency hemming

Have you ever rushed yourself to get dressed only to realize that your hem needs mending? Or that the skirt you sew to wear at that party still needs to be hemmed?

No?! Just me?

Materials

Well the thing is that, apart from being abusive to my clothes when I get dressed, I am also very picky about their length. My hem must, must barely touch the ground when I stand. Whatever the garment is just feels SO awkward if the fabric falls short. That is short to my standards. This means that each pair of trousers I own along with every maxi skirt, although lets be real these are numbered, is paired with specific shoes. I’ll let you imagine what happens when my shoe wardrobe is altered. By more than one pair!

As you probably guested me and my seam ripper can call each other best friends. And although I have mastered every hemming method known to mankind, hand or machine stitched, I still need to have my shortcuts. Enter: Double fusible tape.
I know. Double fusible tape?!Well yes, yes indeed. This transparent weaved tape has, more than a few times, saved me from embarrassment and running late because I must find something to wear that fits me NOW! In case you missed it I hate being late.

So for those of you who are still reading (thank you!) and haven’t yet been introduced to the magic world of double fusible tape, here is a quick visual of how it works in my New Years’ Lunch skirt.

First determine the length of your skirt.

hem length

Trace your hem all around with discrete chalk markings. Remember that you are going to wear the garment right after you are done. Cut off any excess fabric.

Cutting out

Then fold your hem and make a crease using your iron. Remember to set the temperature to medium and turn the steam off.

crease

Now take your double fusible tape and cut a strip whose length equals the circumference of your hem. Place it between the folded fabric and place your iron on top pressing it for around 10 seconds. Do not move your iron forth or backwards since this movement can cause your fabric to shift.

hem

press

And that’s it!

Note: this method lasts only until the next wash.

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